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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 103-107

The Bacteriological and Clinical Outcomes of Ventilator-associated Pneumonia Post-cardiac Surgery in the Pediatric Surgical Intensive Care Unit: A Prospective, Observational Study


1 Department of Cardiac Anaesthesiology, Sri Jayadeva Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences and Research, Mysore, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Anaesthesiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Bathinda, Punjab; Department of Cardiac Anaesthesiology, Sri Jayadeva Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences and Research, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
3 Department of Cardiac Anaesthesiology, Sri Jayadeva Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences and Research, Bangalore, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
K S Bharathi
Department of Cardiac Anaesthesiology, Sri Jayadeva Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences and Research, K.R.S. Road, Mysore 570016, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/bjoa.bjoa_174_21

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Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a serious nosocomial infection that threatens pediatric patients who have undergone cardiac surgery. The aim of this study is to analyze the bacteriological profile and antibiotic resistance pattern of the organisms grown from pediatric patients diagnosed as VAP after cardiac surgery and also to study the bacteriological and clinical outcomes of the patients. Patients and Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted in a tertiary care teaching institution in children aged younger than 14 years who had undergone cardiac surgery and were diagnosed to have VAP and on mechanical ventilation (MV). The clinical and the bacteriological profile of patients with VAP, the systemic antibiotics used, the resistance pattern to the antibiotics, and, finally, the bacteriological and clinical outcomes were analyzed. Results: Among the 98 patients with VAP, 55% were early onset (<4 days of MV) and 45% were late onset (>4 days of MV) VAP. Among the most common pathogens causing VAP, Klebsiella and Escherichia coli contributed to 18% each of the total VAP. Twenty percent of VAP were polymicrobial in origin. About 63% of organisms were resistant to Augmentin, and 11% of the organisms were multidrug resistant (MDR). Conclusion: This study not only showed the pattern of early and late onset VAP but also revealed the bacteriological profile and the resistance pattern of the local microbial flora causing VAP, guiding us in a more efficient management of VAP in children.


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